Monday, November 13, 2017

How to list all Office 365 Groups which are Yammer enabled via the Microsoft Graph

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Office 365 Groups are great, both from a user perspective, and they are also fun to work with as a developer. This time around I wanted to list all Office 365 Groups which have been created via Yammer, as a means to differentiate the type of Office 365 Groups for users.

I started to dig around on properties on the Group object at the /beta endpoint and found the following for a Yammer originating Office 365 Group.

"resourceBehaviorOptions": [
    "YammerProvisioning"
]

Turns out you can use above information in a filter on the /beta/groups endpoint. Using a GET query where you filter on both Unified groups and the YammerProvisioning attribute, will yield the list you are looking for. You can probably omit the groupTypes filter, but it sure doesn’t hurt.

https://graph.microsoft.com/beta/groups?$filter=groupTypes/any(g:g eq 'Unified') and resourceBehaviorOptions/any(r:r+eq+'YammerProvisioning')

There is still no API on the Microsoft Graph to create Yammer enabled Office 365 Groups, but at least we’re one step closer.

Permission wise you need Group.Read.All as either delegated or app only to query for Groups, which means you can easily do this using the GraphHttpClient for SharePoint Framework.

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Programmatically enable Teams on an existing Office 365 Group via the Microsoft Graph

Microsoft recently released PowerShell commands to work with Microsoft Teams, which is something we’ve been longing for since Teams was released. We now get commandlets to create and manage teams and channels.

PowerShell is nice and all, but if you already have a lot of Office 365 Groups, or have your own provisioning solution for Office 365 Groups, enabling Teams on these groups is something you want to add into your existing process.

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And turns out it’s quite easy. I fired off Fiddler to see what was happening when executing the PowerShell commands, and lo and behold, we see queries running against the Microsoft Graph. The creation of the group itself happens against the /edu/groups which I’ve never seen before, but that’s not interesting. The next call to create a Team on the group is the important one.

Run an empty payload of {} with a PUT to /beta/groups/<group id>/team and you’re all set. This command will effectively enable Teams on any group (not Yammer ones). Have existing or new Office 365 Groups? Use the above REST command to enable Teams.

I expect the documentation to be updated soon as this is pretty cool stuff, and guess this will move to the v1.0 endpoint in due time. You can read some docs at https://github.com/microsoftgraph/microsoft-graph-docs/blob/master/api-reference/beta/api/group_put_team.md until it's properly published. Also note that app only takes seems not to be supported at this time.

See the complete listing of PowerShell functions to see what is possible in terms of modifying the team and channels. I didn’t have time to trace all the calls – but should be pretty easy to figure it out if needed until docs are updated. For me, enabling of Teams is the most important at the moment.

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Fetching custom attributes from Azure Active Directory via the Microsoft Graph

This post was inspired by Juan Carlos González who asked a question about retrieving custom/extension attributes from Azure AD via the Microsoft Graph.

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Custom or extension attributes in on-premises active directory is nothing new, and many have set up synchronizing these to Azure AD as well – which makes sense. Once the attributes are in place, you might want to use them in applications as well, and in todays day and age, using the Microsoft Graph API is the way we play.

Custom attributes are not retrievable directly by their name like for example userPrincipalName.

https://graph.microsoft.com/v1.0/me/?$select=userPrincipalName

Instead they are named with extension_<randomid>_attribute, which means we need to figure out what this random id is. As far as I know you cannot list it via the Graph, but using Azure AD PowerShell it’s doable. The below sample shows a custom attribute named division on my user object.

Connect-AzureAD
$aadUser = Get-AzureADUser -ObjectId me@madcow.dog
$aadUser|select -ExpandProperty ExtensionProperty

Key                                                     Value
---                                                     -----
extension_e96266002973421daef990ab9be89e86_division     64

By looking at the result we have the prefix we need which works just fine in a graph query.

https://graph.microsoft.com/v1.0/me/?$select=userPrincipalName,extension_e96266002973421daef990ab9be89e86_division

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Sunday, October 22, 2017

Conditional approval in Microsoft Flow

I’m working on self-service solution in Office 365 where a requirement is that your manager has to approve your request. If however you don’t have a manager, then the approval step should be skipped.

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Flow has an action for retrieving a users manager, so that part is easy. However, if the user does not have a manager, the Flow action will fail. The solution here is to add a parallel branch below the Get manager action. In one path you set the action to run if the previous action failed, in the other if the previous action was successful, like the image below.

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Friday, October 13, 2017

Using Flow to promote better document sharing and collaboration in your organization

During lunch today I mentioned a customer sending me a document attachment in an e-mail, instead of what clearly should have been a sharing link to the file.

Outlook has excellent capabilities for sending sharing links instead of attachments, and especially internally in organization this should be the preferred approach to avoid e-mail bloat and multiple versions of the truth. Forcing people to change is not easy, but the conversation let to the following Flow urging your colleagues to do the right thing :)

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Tuesday, October 10, 2017

Deploy a SharePoint Framework application customizer tenant wide

Creating application customizers which are available to all site collections is a very useful feature. Especially when it comes to site provisioning solutions. In my current project I’m creating a top banner which shows if the Office 365 Group is allowed to have external members, or if the team site can be shared with external users. This extension is installed on all new sites during creation.

Want to know more about a custom self-service solution for Office 365 Groups? Join me at ESPC November 16th 2017 where this post will be part of the solution demoed.

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Wednesday, October 4, 2017

Adding images to SharePoint from a URL - mini life hack

Often you find yourself adding an image to SharePoint which you find on the internet. The upload dialog in SharePoint does not offer to link to a URL outside the domain you are on, so the workaround is to save the image locally, then upload.

At least if you are using Windows there is a quicker approach which usually works, and it also works in most other applications which allow you to upload a file.

Monday, October 2, 2017

Blocking vs. non-blocking Flows

Microsoft Flow has many triggers and one of the most useful ones is the HTTP request trigger, where an external party can call a specified endpoint with a message which will trigger the workflow. Basically this feature has two modes, one where the workflow executes logic and returns the outcome and the other where it does not need to return the outcome.

If you have an application which is translating text and you want the text back to the application you can create a Flow similar to the one below. A request which takes a string as input, the text is then translated to Norwegian, and returned at the end.

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When running a REST query against the Flow URL using for example PowerShell we get the expected result back.

> $json = '{"thetext":"This is a test"}'
> Invoke-RestMethod -Method Post -Uri $uri -Body $json -ContentType "application/json"
dette er en test

This above operation is a blocking one. If you however want the translated text to be sent out as an e-mail, you remove the Response action and add an e-mail action.

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When you now call the Flow URL you will immediately get a 200 success back, while the workflow executes the steps you have added. A non-blocking workflow.

Summary

If you want to use Microsoft Flow as an API in your application with input and output you can include both a Request and Response step. The calling application will then wait until a response is returned (or it times out). If you however want to use Microsoft Flow to execute an fire and forget action, omit the Response step, and the workflow will start executing while your calling application immediately can continue, regardless of what happens in the workflow.

Friday, September 22, 2017

Resolving assemblies when using PnP Core and ADAL / Graph

This is a super technical post and it goes like this:

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If you use NuGet and reference PnP as well as ADAL and Graph clients as I have above, and you write code to apply a pnp template you might run into DLL hell and get the following exception:

"Unable to load one or more of the requested types. Retrieve the LoaderExceptions property for more information."

The reason is that PnP take a dependency on both of these libraries, but on older versions. Deep in the code PnP uses reflection to find all serializer types, and it will throw up an assembly loader exception due to you having newer versions of these DLL’s in your project.

You can either align your dependency with what PnP uses, or you add an assembly redirect from the older to newer versions. Below is code which will dynamically resolve to the newest version for these issues.

Note: This assumes your version is newer than whatever PnP takes a dependency on

Add the code in a static constructor, or somewhere else which ensures it runs once for your application.

public static void RedirectAssembly()
{
    var list = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.GetAssemblies().OrderByDescending(a => a.FullName).Select(a => a.FullName).ToList();
    AppDomain.CurrentDomain.AssemblyResolve += (sender, args) =>
    {
        var requestedAssembly = new AssemblyName(args.Name);
        foreach (string asmName in list)
        {
            if (asmName.StartsWith(requestedAssembly.Name + ","))
            {
                return Assembly.Load(asmName);
            }
        }
        return null;
    };
}

Funny part is that it now works fine for me without this code – but, just in case :)

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Introducing a generic (mostly) all purpose extensibility schema for the Microsoft Graph

If you’ve followed my blog lately you know I’m experimenting with using Graph Extensions from the Microsoft Graph to persist metadata for resources in the graph, more specifically I’m storing metadata about different types of Office 365 Groups.

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I decided to go with schema extensions over open extensions as this allows me to query and filter on my schema properties, instead of just reading and writing the properties. If you plan on only reading and writing data, I recommend using open extensions – why? Read on!